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     Modern lifestyle has taken its toll on our digestive and elimination organs. Refined, processed, low fiber foods, animal fats, a lack of exercise and an ever-increasing level of stress all contribute to our current gastrointestinal health crisis. Digestive system and colon health have reached an-all-time low in the United States. Diseases of the digestive tract are on the rise. In 1994 the #1 Cancer among men and women was Colon-Rectal. LEARN MORE...

DETOX PROGRAM - GO HERE...
 
8 Natural Laws of Health

     Beloved, I wish above all things, that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth. 3 John 2.
     Education in the divine principles of health have never been needed more than today! There have been many wonderful advances in science and technology, but there is an alarming increase in disease and sickness due to destructive habits and the over indulgences of our society. Today, habit and appetite are at war with nature. The results are seen in most of our lives as many experience some minor or major breakdown of their health.
     God's promise still stands - if we incorporate His principles of health into our lives, then none of the diseases of this world will befall us. Listed below are God's 8 Laws of Health, taken from the "owner's manual". Click on a title to learn more.
  • Fresh Air
  • Sunshine
  • Exercise
  • Pure Water
  • Temperance
  • Proper Nutrition
  • Adequate Rest
  • Trust in God
  •  

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    B E C O M I N G   V E G E T A R I A N:
    Why You Should Do This
    and How to Make the Transition
    Page Two

    What is a healthy diet?

         Healthful diets contain the amounts of essential nutrients and calories needed to prevent nutritional deficiencies and excesses. Healthful diets also provide the right balance of carbohydrate, fat, and protein to reduce risks for chronic diseases, and are a part of a full and productive lifestyle. Such diets are obtained from a variety of foods that are available, affordable, and enjoyable. Foods contain combinations of nutrients and other healthful substances. No single food can supply all nutrients in the amounts you need. For example, oranges provide vitamin C but no protein; soy beans provide protein but very little vitamin C. One way to make sure you get all of the nutrients and other substances needed for health, is by choosing the recommended number of daily servings from each of the major food groups displayed in the USDA Food Guide Pyramid, or better yet, read on.

    NOTE: Although the USDA recommendations are a vast improvement over the standard American diet, we highly recommend a vegetarian diet for meeting overall nutritional needs, maintaining excellent health and weight. More on the benefits of the vegetarian lifestyle later.

    The USDA Food Pyramid

    The basis of a healthy diet is eating a wide variety of foods. Every day, according to the USDA, you should try to eat:

    • 6 to 11 servings of bread, cereal, rice, or pasta. One serving equals one slice of bread, about 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal, or 1/2 cup cooked cereal, rice, or pasta.
    • 3 to 5 servings of vegetables. One serving equals 1 cup of raw leafy vegetables, or 1/2 cup of other vegetables, cooked or raw.
    • 2 to 4 servings of fruit. One serving equals one medium apple, banana, or orange; 1/2 cup of chopped, cooked, or canned fruit; or 3/4 cup of fruit juice.
    • 2 to 3 servings of milk, yogurt, or cheese. One serving equals 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1 1/2 ounces of natural cheese (such as Cheddar), or 2 ounces of processed cheese (such as American). Choose low-fat or fat-free products most often.
    • 2 to 3 servings of meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, or nuts. One serving equals 2 to 3 ounces of cooked lean meat, poultry without skin, or fish. You should eat no more than 5 to 7 ounces per day. One half cup of cooked dry beans or 1/2 cup of tofu counts as 1 ounce of meat. Two tablespoons of peanut butter or 1/3 cup of nuts counts as 1 ounce of lean meat.

    What is a serving size?

         You can not always measure your food. Here are some ways to help you estimate serving sizes.

    • 1/2 cup of rice or pasta = size of ice cream scoop
    • 1 cup of salad greens = size of a baseball
    • 1/2 cup of chopped fruit or vegetables = size of a lightbulb
    • 1 1/2 ounces of cheese = size of four dice
    • 3 ounces of meat or fish = size of a deck of cards or casette tape
    • 2 tablespoons peanut butter = size of a ping pong ball

    Quick tips for healthy eating - next >>>